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    UNCHANGED0.00%
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Leaked audit report points to Post Office chaos

A leaked report by the audit committee of the embattled Post Office provides an account of chronic mismanagement and weak internal controls.

How slain tycoon Wiggill took SA's banks for a R1bn ride

One billion rand: this is the eye-popping amount owed personally by Jeff Wiggill, former chairman of First Strut, to financial institutions when he was shot dead last year.

SA stakes place up there on the cloud

South Africa may not have the high-speed broadband of leading industrial nations, nor the tech start-up culture that has given birth to global giants.

Following the path less travelled

What is more important to you, fame or fortune?

Neither. Being happy and having peace of mind is most important to me.

...

SA stakes place up there on the cloud

South Africa may not have the high-speed broadband of leading industrial nations, nor the tech start-up culture that has given birth to global giants.

Leaked audit report points to Post Office chaos

A leaked report by the audit committee of the embattled Post Office provides an account of chronic mismanagement and weak internal controls.

How slain tycoon Wiggill took SA's banks for a R1bn ride

One billion rand: this is the eye-popping amount owed personally by Jeff Wiggill, former chairman of First Strut, to financial institutions when he was shot dead last year.

Falling stock markets: here we go again...

FOR stock markets, October is historically the cruellest month. This year is no exception.

The crashes of 1929, 1987, 2001 and 2008 were ...

Lonmin's failed gag bid puts spotlight on transfer pricing

ATTEMPTS by platinum giant Lonmin to stop the release of a report by the Alternative Information and Development Centre (AIDC), which puts the spotlight on transfer pricing by mining groups, appears to have backfired, and spurred debate on the controversial issue.

Your cheque is in the ...

IF ROSEY Sekese drank whiskey, she would be knocking it back neat.

63000 South Africans among world richest 1%

DESPITE the 5% drop in the rand-dollar exchange rate, the number of South Africans with net wealth (after debts are taken off) of more than $1-million rose to 47000.

Money's really no object in Steyn City

IF you squint your eyes from the Steyn City clubhouse piazza, you might just imagine you're in San Gimignano. Cast your gaze to the right, however, and your Tuscan reveries will vanish.

'Build your business from the ground up'

No ExcusesMouton scoffs at 'myth' that black entrepreneurs are held back by banks that won't finance projects

SA business gears up for its 'Oscar' awards

SOUTH Africa's top company will be named at the Sunday Times Top 100 Companies awards dinner, taking place on October 28 in association with Johnnie Walker .

Sanral's e-toll line flies in face of logic and policy

I CANNOT fully understand the logic of the user-pays principle, seemingly so self-evident to the Treasury and the South African National Roads Agency.

Africa rides the rails once more

Stoking GrowthPrivate-sector funds and rolling-stock charters keep wheels turning on heavy-haul rail renaissance

Americans hot for SA sink $37bn into stocks

SHARES in South African resources companies are proving to be a hit with American investors who have already ploughed $37.8-billion (about R418.9-billion) into buying South African stocks in the US.

Activist Botha ruffles Tsogo Sun's feathers

YOU could have cut the atmosphere with a chainsaw this week at Tsogo Sun's annual general meeting as Theo Botha, shareholder activist and perennial thorn in the side of many JSE-listed giants, got under the skin of chairman Johnny Copelyn.

Oops!... I did it again, says Bono

U2 lead singer Bono apologised this week to iTunes users who objected to receiving an automatic ...

Gourd squashes rivals

A ONE-TON pumpkin grown in northern California has been declared North America's heaviest to date.

Businesses must focus on common good

BUSINESSES exist to make profit. No argument there. The question is whether this is an all-encompassing expression of their raison d'être.

Time for a frank look at the post office's future

THE irony about the South African Post Office strike, former First National Bank CEO Michael Jordaan tweeted this week, is that the longer it drags on, the more its customers will move to electronic alternatives - never to return.

A Nobel for slaying - or at least containing - giants

JEAN Tirole became the second Frenchman to win a Nobel prize this year, bagging the economic sciences award for his ...

PPC row flares as Foord bats for Ketso

IN an unprecedented move that could resolve the standoff at PPC, Foord Asset Management (FAM) will ask the board of the 120-year-old cement producer to convene a special shareholders meeting to elect a new board.

Countdown to SA's business 'Oscars'

SOUTH Africa's best-performing company will walk away with accolades at the Sunday Times Top 100 Companies awards dinner being held on October 28 in association with Johnnie Walker.

Red October across globe

TRADERS on world markets were contemplating the window ledge on Wednesday. But on Friday they were popping champagne corks.

Board member brews controversy

THERE may not be a direct line between John Manzoni's SABMiller directorship and the recent electoral success of the UK Independence Party (UKIP) in Britain - but there probably is a line.

Giving it all away

AS the extent of Jeff Wiggill's debt becomes clearer, liquidators, creditors and former friends have begun uncovering his astonishing acts of generosity, some of which took place as he was defrauding financial firms to keep his companies afloat.

King code got it wrong -Mouton

WHY did African Bank collapse while Capitec Bank continues to go from strength to strength?

Cosatu's objections delay retirement reforms

RETIREMENT tax reforms meant to kick in from March next year have been delayed, after organised labour struck a behind-closed-doors deal with the Treasury last weekend.

AngloGold advisers in firing line

WHAT is at risk in a botched share sale and an investor rebellion?

Avoid Lonmin like the Bermuda Triangle

THERE's more than one reason why investors would do well to steer clear of Lonmin, the world's third-largest platinum company.

Pick n Pay profit up, but analysts worry

IT seemed good news when retailer Pick n Pay released half-year results for the six months to August this week, showing a 6.8% rise in turnover, 35% growth in profit before tax and 35.8% improvement in earnings per share. It also opened 46 new stores in the period.

Superstar Messi innocent of R57m tax fraud, says dad

BARCELONA and Argentina soccer star Lionel Messi had nothing to do with his own tax affairs and should not be included in an investigation into an alleged tax fraud, his father Jorge has insisted.

Nene needs a plan for Eskom - and iron fist on wages

FINANCE Minister Nhlanhla Nene faces a baptism of fire when he unveils his first budget update this week as flagging growth and ballooning budget deficits take a toll on government finances, threatening to undermine South Africa's international credit ratings.

Stake in education paying off for Mouton

JANNIE Mouton's notion of building companies slowly, brick-by-brick, is paying rich dividends.

Privatising railways is uphill most of the way

THE locomotive building and leasing sectors may be booming, but it is a long leap from there to actually running a railway in another country.

A R2m bottle of whisky, anyone? Join the queue

SOUTH Africans tend to be a flashy lot. We're judged by the clothes we wear, the shoes on our feet, the cars we drive and the cellphones we carry. No one has to know that we are nursing an ulcer generated by the worry of our mounting debts to cultivate the image of debonair sophisticates - as long as the world believes we have cracked it.

Six reasons why stock markets are tumbling

GREECE

There are fears about the stability of the Greek government and its bailout plans.

David Madden, an ...

How loan sharks abuse the debt laws

THERE is an appalling, nightmarish quality about the affidavits filed in the case lodged by Stellenbosch University's legal aid centre with the High Court in Cape Town. One after another tells the story of how a life can be destroyed by a loan taken out to meet an expense or buy an item that seemed affordable.

Markets bounce back as buyers seek bargains

LOCAL share prices surged back on Friday, led by retailers, as worries about global economic growth eased and the main indices booked their biggest daily percentage gains in more than a year.

A cheap new tablet that can speak Zulu

SOUTH Africans can now choose to have a tablet with Zulu-language capability, rather than an iPad, thanks to Vodacom.

Retail sales slip but PnP boosts profit

PICK n Pay Stores posted a 32% rise in half-year profit as cost cuts helped offset sluggish sales growth. Headline earnings per share totalled 53.98c compared with 40.81c a year earlier.

Buffett's brand equity

WARREN Buffett plans to license the Berkshire Hathaway name to estate agencies in Europe and Asia in the next phase of a campaign to use his ...

Finland's core sectors eaten away by Apple

TECHNOLOGY giant Apple is to blame for Finland's economic woes, says its prime minister.

Gun tycoon's angry ex fires first shot in R5.5bn salvo

THE ex-wife of the owner of the Glock gun company is suing him for hundreds of millions of dollars, claiming he cheated her out of the firm they founded in Austria 50 years ago.

Seesawing prices keep investors guessing

YOU have to chuckle at Mr Market, the old blighter, for doing his best to make monkeys of us all. On Wednesday, it was impossible to find a talking head willing to see any light ahead, but by Friday - after two nicely positive moves on the S&P500 (and the JSE) everyone's back to holding thumbs.