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Wed May 27 03:48:52 SAST 2015

The lie of the land: iLIVE

Mike, by e-mail | 29 November, 2012 00:34
More than 50 houses in Lenasia have been demolished by the provincial government after con artists sold plots to would-be home owners with false deeds of sale. File photo
Image by: Daniel Born

Perhaps one of your legally qualified correspondents could elucidate a problem I have regarding the Lenasia demolitions. As I understand it, people acquired land in good faith and built houses on it under the mistaken belief that the government employees who dealt with the matter had the necessary authority.

It now transpires that they were acting fraudulently.

The question is: does a citizen have to investigate the internal workings of a government department before embarking on a transaction?

If not, one would presume that the government is liable to compensate the "owners" for their losses.

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