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Tue Sep 02 23:14:09 SAST 2014

An open letter to Zuma: ILIVE

Keiyuren Govender, by e-mail | 18 February, 2013 00:26
President Jacob Zuma
Image by: KEVIN SUTHERLAND

Dear Mr President

I would like to congratulate you on being elected president of the ANC for a second term.

As leader of the ruling party you will also be appointed president of South Africa. The fact that you have been appointed in these crucial positions indicates you have the support of many South Africans. This brings me to the reason why I'm reaching out to you.

I am 15 and in Grade 11 at Southlands Secondary, a public school in Chatsworth, Durban. I was born in 1997 and consider myself a "born free".

With the assistance of my parents and teachers I am doing everything possible to ensure I obtain the best education to prepare me for the future. I regularly attend school and participate in all curricular and extra-curricular activities. I complement my school work with extra tuition with the aim of obtaining good symbols in my matric year.

However, I feel I'm wasting my time. This insecurity can be attributed to the fact that many friends who have completed matric were unable to secure places at universities. One was unable to gain entrance at medical school despite having eight distinctions. Some friends and family members were forced to head to other countries to pursue their academic dreams. They were punished because they were born of parents who are of Indian origin.

My parents, grandparents and great-grandparents were born here. This makes me a true South African.

I do not want to go to a foreign country. I want to stay here and be skilled so I can serve my country. I make every attempt to integrate with other cultural and race groups. I support Bafana Bafana, the Proteas and the Springboks. I take pride in singing our national anthem under the South African flag.

What more must I do to be considered a true South African? Do I have a future in the country of my birth? Will I be given an opportunity to help develop the country I love? Mr President, I'm convinced you have the answers I am looking for.

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Tue Sep 02 23:14:09 SAST 2014 ::