Latest
 
  • All Share : 52635.8
    UP 1.44%
    Top40 - (Tradeable) : 46408.94
    UP 1.48%
    Financial 15 : 14788.23
    UP 1.76%
    Industrial 25 : 71565.72
    UP 1.24%
    Resource 10 : 30684.76
    UP 1.68%

  • ZAR/USD : 14.846
    UP 0.39%
    ZAR/GBP : 19.9266
    UP 0.50%
    ZAR/EUR : 16.5167
    UP 0.49%
    ZAR/JPY : 0.1438
    UP 0.42%
    ZAR/AUD : 11.0497
    UP 0.44%

  • Gold US$/oz : 1316.5
    DOWN -0.14%
    Platinum US$/oz : 1001
    DOWN -0.69%
    Silver US$/oz : 18.36
    UP 0.49%
    Palladium US$/oz : 586
    DOWN -0.34%
    Brent Crude : 50.17
    DOWN -0.08%

  • All data is delayed by 15 min. Data supplied by Profile Data
    Hover cursor over this ticker to pause.

Thu Jun 30 14:12:51 SAST 2016

A diet rich in blueberries, citrus fruits, and red wine can help reduce erectile dysfunction

AFP Relaxnews | 15 January, 2016 09:54
A glass of red wine.
Image by: AFP Relaxnews © Ramon L. Farinos /shutterstock.com

A new collaborative study between Harvard University in the US and the University of East Anglia in the UK has found that a diet full of flavonoid-rich foods can help reduce the risk of erectile dysfunction, a condition which affects up to half of all middle-aged and older men.

Exercise is already known to be beneficial for those suffering from erectile dysfunction, however this is a pioneering study in terms of looking at how the condition can be improved by eating a diet rich in flavonoids, the compounds found in many plant-based food and drinks -- including fruit and vegetables, tea, herbs, and even wine -- that are known to have an antioxidant effect on the body.

To conduct their research the two teams looked at more than 50,000 middle-aged men and questioned them at four-year intervals on their ability to have and maintain an erection that enabled them to take part in sexual intercourse. The men were questioned in 2000, 2004, and again in 2008. They were also asked to provide a history of their erectile dysfunction that dated back to 1986.

Information on their diet was also collected every four years, with the team focusing on the effects of six commonly consumed different types of flavonoids.

More than one third of the men reported that they suffered from erectile dysfunction, however the results showed that those consuming a diet rich in flavonoids were less likely to suffer from the condition, with just a few portions a week of flavonoid-rich foods decreasing the likelihood of suffering from erectile dysfunction by 10%, with the strongest benefits seen in men under the age of 70.

A diet high in fruit also reduced the risk by 14%, and when combining a flavonoid-rich diet with exercise, the risk was reduced even further, by 21%. The research also showed that eating a flavonoid-rich diet is as beneficial for those suffering from erectile dysfunction as briskly walking for up to five hours a week.

Of the six flavonoids studied, the team found three in particular to be the most beneficial: anthocyanins, found in blueberries, cherries, blackberries, radishes and black currants; and flavanones and flavones, which are found in citrus fruits. The most popular sources of these three flavonoids in the US are strawberries, blueberries, red wine, apples, pears, and citrus products.

And according to Dr Eric Rimm, senior author on the study, a diet rich in flavonoids could also have additional benefits, "As well as improving sexual health for middle-aged men, there is another important benefit linked to heart health. Erectile dysfunction is often an early barometer of poor vascular function and offers a critical opportunity to intervene and prevent cardiovascular disease, heart attack and even death.

"Men with erectile dysfunction are likely to be highly motivated to make healthier lifestyle choices, such as exercising more and eating the right foods -- which would greatly benefit their long-term cardiovascular health as well."

SHARE YOUR OPINION

If you have an opinion you would like to share on this article, please send us an e-mail to the Times LIVE iLIVE team. In the mean time, click here to view the Times LIVE iLIVE section.