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Why breastfeeding in South Africa still needs champions

Breastfeeding has been proven to protect the health of mothers and babies. It naturally inoculates babies against disease because the mother’s immune system kick starts the baby’s ability to resist illness. This applies in both low-income and high-income settings.

Familicides – how apartheid killed its own

In this extract from her book, “The End of Whiteness: Satanism and Family Murder in Late Apartheid South Africa”, the University of the Witwatersrand’s Nicky Falkof explores how during the height of apartheid family murders became what was termed a “bloody epidemic”.

New study finds obese individuals have brains 'ten years older' at middle-age

New research from the University of Cambridge, UK, has found that from middle age, the brains of those who are obese show differences in white matter similar to those seen in slimmer individuals who are ten years older.

Chicken scent offers hope for malaria prevention

Ethiopian scientists have discovered mosquitoes are repulsed by the smell of chicken, raising hopes for the development of a novel way to prevent a disease that kills hundreds of thousands every year.

Life & Style

Austrian biotech plans Zika vaccine clinical trials in 12 months

An Austrian biotech company working with the Institut Pasteur said on Tuesday it planned to start clinical trials with an experimental Zika vaccine in the next 12 months, marking a further acceleration of research in the field.

Living near high levels of greenery may reduce aggressive behavior in teens

A new US study has found yet another health benefit of "green space," finding that adolescents who live in neighborhoods with more greenery may have less aggressive behaviors.

Vaccines block Zika in mice, boosting hopes for human jab

New research in lab animals, including Zika vaccines successfully tested on mice, boosted hopes Tuesday for a jab to shield humans against the brain-damaging virus.

Cardinal Wilfred Napier tweets about abortion‚ apologies‚ Brexit and Nkandla

Cardinal Wilfrid Napier‚ former leader of the Catholic Church in South Africa‚ is stirring up debate – in thought-provoking bursts of 140 characters - questioning the need for the church to apologise to homosexuals.

Broccoli could soon be giving you an even bigger health boost, suggests new research

Already known for its super health benefits, scientists have found a way to give broccoli even more of a boost, by identifying the genes which control the vegetable's phenolic compounds.

Make changes to your pre-bed routine for a better night's sleep: study

New Australian research suggests that sleep could be another important lifestyle factor for athletes wanting to improve their sporting performance, with the findings also providing some insight into how all of us can help get a better night's sleep.

X-rays in the cloud a symbol of the future‚ says Makhura

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital has rolled out a new IT system to ensure all digital X-rays‚ MRI and CAT scans are kept in the digital cloud.

Breastfeeding linked to better childhood behavior: study

Children breastfed exclusively for their first six months of life have an easier time behaving as primary school students, according to new research.

Health

Pregnancy multivitamins 'unnecessary' for most: experts

Multivitamins and mineral supplements in pregnancy are an "unnecessary expense" with no proven benefits for most well-nourished women or their babies, said a review of science data.

Deep brain stimulation can improve Parkinson's symptoms by 70%

By stimulating the brains of Parkinson's patients using electrodes, neurologists at France's CHU Saint-Étienne University Hospital found that this surgical technique could improve motor performance by 70% and reduce medication-based treatment by 40 to 60%.

Omega-3s cut fatal heart attack risk 10 percent: study

Consuming foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, sardines and anchovies, can reduce risk of a deadly heart attack by 10 percent, a study said.

Antibodies found which 'neutralise' Zika virus: study

European scientists announced that they had discovered antibodies which attack Zika, a step they hope will pave the way for a protective vaccine against the brain-damaging virus.

Pregnant women with Zika have up to 13% risk of microcephaly: study

Pregnant women infected with the Zika virus during the first trimester have a risk of up to 13 percent that their infant will be born with the microcephaly birth defect, a new study says.

Spanish scientists use skin cells to create human sperm

Scientists in Spain on Wednesday say that they have created human sperm from skin cells, a medical feat which could eventually lead to a treatment for infertility.

Gene-editing to beat HIV

A cure for HIV and Aids could be a few years away now that scientists have proved that they can snip the virus off infected cells and prevent it returning.

US performs its first uterus transplant

The United States has completed its first uterus transplant surgery, following on a technique already proven in Sweden that could help women suffering from infertility, the Cleveland Clinic said Thursday.

Loss of Y chromosome linked to Alzheimer's disease: study

About one in five men over age 80 lose the Y chromosome from their blood cells, and this condition has now been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, researchers said.