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Wed Oct 22 11:41:57 SAST 2014

China expands pollution monitoring to biggest cities

Reuters | 30 December, 2012 08:52
A security guard watches people from behind a hedge overlooking Beijing's Tiananmen Square.
Image by: DAVID GRAY / REUTERS

China plans to release hourly air pollution monitoring data in 74 of its biggest cities starting on New Year’s Day, state media says.

Choking pollution and murky grey skies in Chinese cities is a top gripe among both Chinese and expatriates.

Microscopic pollutant particles in the air have killed about 8600 people prematurely this year and cost $1 billion in economic losses in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an, according to a study by Beijing University and Greenpeace that measured the pollutant levels of PM2,5, or particles smaller than 2,5 micrometres in diameter.

The new monitoring will include not only PM2,5, but also sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and carbon monoxide, the Xinhua news agency said, citing a Friday announcement by the Ministry of Environmental Protection.

Data will be collected from 496 monitoring stations, it said.

First Beijing, then other cities have become more public about their air quality data since the US embassy in Beijing began publishing hourly data from a pollution monitor installed on embassy grounds in Beijing.

The embassy’s monitor often diverged with official air quality readings, adding to public pressure for the city to come clean about the state of its air.

The United States has extended its monitoring programme to its consulates in China.

Sunday was a clear and sunny winter day in Beijing, with the levels of ozone and PM2,5 declared “moderate” or “good”, according to embassy data. The Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center rated PM10 concentrations as “excellent”.

Many Chinese cities have removed belching smokestacks and coal-burning factories from their centres in the past few years, but a rise in the number of cars during the same period has created new air quality problems.

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Wed Oct 22 11:41:57 SAST 2014 ::