• All Share : 50507.59
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Top 40 : 3738.95
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Financial 15 : 15605.51
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Industrial 25 : 61994.65
    UNCHANGED0.00%

  • ZAR/USD : 10.9681
    UP 0.19%
    ZAR/GBP : 17.2145
    UP 0.04%
    ZAR/EUR : 13.6775
    UP 0.12%
    ZAR/JPY : 0.0931
    UP 0.16%
    ZAR/AUD : 9.3603
    DOWN -0.08%

  • Gold : 1198.5050
    DOWN -0.22%
    Platinum : 1221.5000
    UP 0.12%
    Silver : 16.6200
    DOWN -0.19%
    Palladium : 795.0000
    UP 0.89%
    Brent Crude Oil : 78.420
    UP 0.11%

  • All data is delayed by 15 min. Data supplied by I-Net Bridge
    Hover cursor over this ticker to pause.

Wed Nov 26 07:21:17 CAT 2014

Strike to start again this week

QUINTON MTYALA | 07 January, 2013 00:14
Striking farmworkers in Wolseley near Ceres in the Western Cape. While the situation is currently calm, a speedy resolution on a new minimum wage is improbable, and tensions may once again flare up
Image by: HALDEN KROG

Trade union federation Cosatu says a resumption of the farmworkers' strike on Wednesday can only be averted if AgriSA agrees to negotiate increased wages by different farming sectors.

But AgriSA, which is SA's largest farmers' unions, says it does not have a mandate to negotiate on behalf of farmers.

Farmworkers embarked on a violent strike in November on several Western Cape farms, demanding wages be increased to R150 a day from the current R69.

AgriSA president Johannes Möller said the organisation would assist Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant to change agriculture's sectoral wage determination.

"If the strike goes ahead it would be disastrous; not just for a few farmers but for the industry," said Möller.

The deadlock in negotiations has, says Cosatu's Western Cape secretary, Tony Ehrenreich, left workers with very little choice but to resume their strike action after suspending it on November 14.

Two farmworkers were killed during the protest action in Western Cape.

"Associations want to negotiate because January is the busiest month of the harvesting season," says Ehrenreich.

He says that along with higher wages, workers are also demanding part ownership of farms as opposed to share-scheme deals that are currently being promoted in the Western Cape, as well as security of tenure to prevent their being evicted from farms.

Ehrenreich said striking workers would also call for a boycott of South Africa's fruit products exported overseas.

And while Cosatu was opposed to violence, Ehrenreich said farmworkers called for the strike and thus the union federation could make no guarantees that the strike would be peaceful.

"Workers are not prepared to continue working under these slave conditions," said Ehrenreich.

SHARE YOUR OPINION

If you have an opinion you would like to share on this article, please send us an e-mail to the Times LIVE iLIVE team. In the mean time, click here to view the Times LIVE iLIVE section.