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Sat Oct 01 10:42:17 CAT 2016

Traffic fumes linked to infertility risk

Reuters | 18 January, 2016 00:17
The study was one of the first of its kind to follow so many women over such a long period of time and more research is needed before medical recommendations based on the results can be made, Mahalingaiah said. File photo
Image by: CHARLES PLATIAU / REUTERS

Women who live close to busy highways, where the air is polluted by traffic exhaust fumes, might be slightly more likely to have fertility problems than women who live further away, where the air is cleaner, a US study suggests.

Researchers followed more than 36000 women from 1993 until 2003 and analysed air pollution and traffic exhaust fumes near their homes to see if what they breathed might be connected to their ability to conceive.

Over the study period, there were about 2500 reported cases of infertility. Women who lived close to a major roadway - within less than 200m - were 11% more likely to experience this problem than women who lived farther from a highway, the study found.

"The risks are slight," said study leader Shruthi Mahalingaiah, a researcher at Boston University School of Medicine.

But even the slightly increased risk can present a big global public health problem, said Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, a researcher at the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health.

"For an individual woman the results might not be that important because the risk of infertility increases only slightly, but for society as a whole it is important because so many women are exposed to air pollution," Nieuwenhuijsen added.

The study was one of the first of its kind to follow so many women over such a long period of time and more research is needed before medical recommendations based on the results can be made, Mahalingaiah said.

Even so, the findings add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that pollution can hinder conception efforts, said Sajal Gupta, a researcher at Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio, who was not involved in the study.

"Couples suffering from infertility need to be careful, especially if they live in an area in which there is high particulate pollution," Gupta said.

Infertility is only one of many health problems tied to air pollution, noted Christopher Somers, a biology researcher at the University of Regina, in Canada.

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