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Wed Aug 31 00:46:49 SAST 2016

Hip-hop going straight to hell

Leonie Wagner | 22 January, 2016 00:15
US rapper Lil Wayne has the highest count of swear words in his lyrics, followed closely by Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Busta Rhymes and TI Wayne. File photo
Image by: STEVE MARCUS / REUTERS

If cleanliness is next to godliness then hip-hop is going straight to hell.

According to a new study by the lyrics website Musixmatch, hip-hop is the most profane genre of music, followed by heavy metal.

The website analysed lyrics from pop, hip-hop, indie rock, folk, heavy metal, country and electronic music. The most Googled artists were selected and their lyrics were analysed.

Of the 361 artists studied, it was no surprise that rappers reigned supreme as the worst potty-mouthed artists.

US rapper Lil Wayne has the highest count of swear words in his lyrics, followed closely by Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Busta Rhymes and TI Wayne.

The study found that for every 31 words in his songs, L'il Wayne used one profanity.

Rapper Chief Keef also ranked highly on the list.

But heavy metal bands Korn and Slipknot also used profanity, giving the genre its second place on the scale.

Folk and country was the least profane, with "ass" being the most commonly used swear word.

94.7 music manager Thando Makhunga said that this pattern was similar for the local market, which "dramatically impacts the quality of the radio version".

"Commercially successful local hip-hop artists generally don't use profanity as frequently on their hit singles as their international counterparts do.

"Local house, rock and pop artists might have the odd swear word here and there, but it is the exception rather than the rule," Makhunga added.

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