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Tue Sep 27 10:44:01 CAT 2016

High road to selling a home

Nashira Davids | 03 March, 2016 00:43
Carol Reynolds, a Pam Golding Properties manager in Durban, and Laurie Wener, the company's managing director in the Western Cape metro, said some clients won't buy homes with the number four in the address. File photo
Image by: iStock/MorePixels

It is not just exquisite kitchens or truckloads of space that sell a house. Often it is quirky features buyers are looking for.

Tony Clarke, managing director of Rawson Property, said that in the UK addresses that had the name "Warren" in them listed for more money than homes with "more mundane" names.

While this might not be the case in South Africa, he said the most expensive houses in the country had the description "road" in their addresses. This includes Nettleton Road in Clifton, where homes fetch up to R200-million.

"Addresses with the word 'street' in them are quite rare on the luxury property chart-toppers. 'Road' features the most often on the most expensive list, with 'avenue' taking second place," said Clarke, who pointed out that a house with its own name, rather than just a number, is perceived to have a unique personality.

"After all, what sounds more enticing? 22 Park Street or Parkside Manor," he asked.

In addition, he said researchers had found homes with even or higher numbers achieved lower sales.

Carol Reynolds, a Pam Golding Properties manager in Durban, and Laurie Wener, the company's managing director in the Western Cape metro, said some clients won't buy homes with the number four in the address.

"Chinese buyers consider number four unlucky," said Wener.

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