Latest
 
  • All Share : 48530.47
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Top 40 : 3936.07
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Financial 15 : 14140.50
    UNCHANGED0.00%
    Industrial 25 : 58200.02
    UNCHANGED0.00%

  • ZAR/USD : 11.0417
    UP 0.10%
    ZAR/GBP : 17.8054
    UP 0.12%
    ZAR/EUR : 14.0487
    UP 0.12%
    ZAR/JPY : 0.1032
    UP 0.08%
    ZAR/AUD : 9.7049
    UP 0.31%

  • Gold : 1247.4700
    DOWN -0.07%
    Platinum : 1277.7000
    UP 0.21%
    Silver : 17.4650
    DOWN -0.20%
    Palladium : 778.2500
    UP 0.94%
    Brent Crude Oil : 86.290
    UP 0.08%

  • All data is delayed by 15 min. Data supplied by I-Net Bridge
    Hover cursor over this ticker to pause.

Wed Oct 22 06:49:31 SAST 2014

Indonesian Komodo dragon attack leaves two hospitalised

Sapa-AFP | 06 February, 2013 10:47
Raja, a Komodo Dragon, bites a carved pumpkin. File picture.
Image by: SUZANNE PLUNKETT / REUTERS

A Komodo dragon in Indonesia has attacked two employees in one of the giant lizards' protected island habitats, leaving its victims hospitalised with serious injuries, an official said Wednesday.

One victim, a 50-year-old park ranger, was sitting at his desk at the Rinca island front office, where tourists usually check in, when the two-metre-long monitor snuck into his room Tuesday afternoon.

"The man panicked when he saw the Komodo and tried to escape by jumping on a chair, but the Komodo quickly grabbed and bit one of his legs," Komodo National Park official Heru Rudiharto told AFP.

Rudiharto said the ranger was the victim of a similar Komodo attack in 2009 and was still traumatised.

Another employee, aged 35, heard the ranger scream and quickly ran to his aid, but the lizard also attacked him, taking a bite at his leg.

Both are in good condition after being given stitches at a health clinic, Rudiharto said, but they are being monitored in hospital to ensure an infection does not develop.

Until recently, Komodos were believed to hunt with a "bite and wait" strategy using toxic bacteria in their saliva to weaken or kill their prey, before descending in numbers to feast.

But recent research found that the dragons' jaws are armed with highly sophisticated poison glands that can cause paralysis, spasms and shock through haemorrhaging.

They are native to several Indonesian islands and are considered a vulnerable species, with only a few thousand left in the world. Their normal diet consists of large mammals, reptiles and birds.

A Komodo in October attacked a woman collecting grass for animal feed at the park, Rudiharto said. She has recovered from a serious leg injury.

The world's largest monitor lizard, Komodos can grow up to three metres (10 feet) and typically weigh to 70 kilograms (150 pounds).

SHARE YOUR OPINION

If you have an opinion you would like to share on this article, please send us an e-mail to the Times LIVE iLIVE team. In the mean time, click here to view the Times LIVE iLIVE section.
Wed Oct 22 06:49:31 SAST 2014 ::