HIV study conducted in DRC by top scientists could ‘give hope for cure’

03 March 2021 - 10:58 By TimesLIVE
The team of researchers consists of scientists from pharmaceutical company Abbott, Université Protestante au Congo, Johns Hopkins, the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the University of Missouri. Stock photo.
The team of researchers consists of scientists from pharmaceutical company Abbott, Université Protestante au Congo, Johns Hopkins, the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the University of Missouri. Stock photo.
Image: 123RF/David Izquierdo Roger

A study conducted in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and published in eBioMedicine could possibly contribute to finding a cure for HIV. 

eBioMedicine forms part of The Lancet family of medical journals.

The study analysed samples taken from patients who have been living with the human immunodeficiency virus between 1987 and 2019.

The lead scientist in the research, Mary Rodgers, said: “When we first started to see the data coming in from the study we were surprised, but we were also elated. This could mean this is something we can cure.”

According to the BBC, the medical research discovered 4% of HIV carriers in the DRC were able to suppress the virus. Commonly less than 1% of those living with the immunodeficiency virus can do that. 

TimesLIVE


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