Hundreds of informal traders get permits to work in locked-down Joburg

07 April 2020 - 07:46 By SISANDA MBOLEKWA
City of Joburg spokesperson Nthatisi Modingoane said they were concerned that not all food informal traders were aware that they could now operate as essential services.
City of Joburg spokesperson Nthatisi Modingoane said they were concerned that not all food informal traders were aware that they could now operate as essential services.
Image: SIMON MATHEBULA

Hundreds of informal traders will now be able to ply their trade on the streets of Johannesburg during the Covid-19 lockdown.

This comes after the City of Johannesburg's economic development department began the process of rolling out permits to informal traders.

On Monday alone, 766 permits were issued — with the final number dependent on how many traders registered with the municipality apply. The issuing of the permits comes after informal traders were deemed “essential” under the Disaster Management Act last week.

The city said, about 1,600 permits would be issued.

TimesLIVE was told on Monday that the traders had to produce their City of Johannesburg certificate of acceptance, proof of trading and a valid ID/passport as documentation to be allowed  to trade.

Economic development MMC Lloyd Phillips said: “We have put systems and capacity in place to make sure this process runs smoothly. We do not want people to stand in queues for a long time.”

City of Joburg spokesperson Nthatisi Modingoane said they were concerned that not all food informal traders were aware that they could now operate as essential services.

“We are taking steps to create awareness [on] the amended regulations through various mediums,” Modingoane said.

Meanwhile, in Cape Town, urban management MMC Grant Twigg called on food traders to contact their nearest municipal office to apply for permits to operate.

He said that the city had initially suspended all informal trading activities in line with the first set of gazetted regulations — but that when the rules were changed, they were now issuing permits.

He further added that the traders could operate between 8am and 5pm, had to keep 1m distance between stalls, and had to wear personal protective equipment, including a mask, sanitisers, gloves and have water available.


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