US ELECTIONS | Why recounts rarely change the results of US elections

US President Donald Trump hopes a recount of votes will help keep President-elect Joe Biden out of the White House, but as common as recounts may be, especially for state and local candidates, only three in the last two decades have changed the result and none for a presidential election.

13 November 2020 - 06:39 By TimesLIVE
US President-elect Joe Biden
US President-elect Joe Biden
Image: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

November 13 2020 - 14:57

Biden cements victory by winning Arizona, but Trump still refuses to concede

President-elect Joe Biden cemented his US electoral victory by capturing the battleground state of Arizona late on Thursday, but the official transition to his administration remains stalled as President Donald Trump refuses to accept defeat.

Biden was projected to win Arizona after more than a week of vote counting from the November 3 election, Edison Research said.

He becomes only the second Democratic presidential candidate in seven decades to win the traditionally Republican state

—Reuters

November 13 2020 - 07:57

Biden cements victory by flipping Arizona, as Trump keeps transition in limbo

Biden's win in Arizona gives the Democrat 290 electoral votes in the state-by-state Electoral College that determines the winner, more than the 270 needed to claim victory. Biden is also winning the popular vote by more than 5.3 million votes, or 3.4 percentage points.

November 13 2020 - 06:47

Can Trump get a recount?

In a recount, authorities repeat the process of tallying up votes. They are a relatively common feature of US elections, though rare in presidential contests.

November 13 2020 - 06:30

November 13 2020 - 06:22

November 13 2020 - 06:17

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