DA submits 7,000 pages of 'evidence' in case against Mkhwebane

21 February 2020 - 20:17 By Ernest Mabuza
DA chief whip Natasha Mazzone.
DA chief whip Natasha Mazzone.
Image: Esa Alexander/Sunday Times

The DA has submitted over 7,000 pages of supplementary evidence to National Assembly speaker Thandi Modise to strengthen its motion for the removal of Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane from office.

In January, Modise approved a DA request for parliament to initiate proceedings for the removal of Mkhwebane from office.

This follows the adoption in December by the National Assembly of new rules concerning the removal of office bearers at institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Office of the Public Protector.

“With over 7,000 pages to support our motion, the DA hopes that parliament will act swiftly by establishing an ad hoc committee for Mkhwebane’s removal proceedings,” DA chief  whip Natasha Mazzone said on Friday.

She said there had been mounting evidence and continuous blunders to support the DA's calls for Mkhwebane’s removal since the submission of its motion.

Mazzone said some of Mkhwebane's notable blunders include the finding by the Constitutional Court that she acted in bad faith and was not honest with the high court regarding her investigation process in the Reserve Bank matter.

“Throughout her tenure as public protector, Mkhwebane has time and again demonstrated an inability to conduct her work independently, and has illustrated a poor understanding of both the law, as well as of her mandate as public protector.”

Mazzone said Mkhwebane’s actions had caused immeasurable damage to the reputation of the Office of the Public Protector.

Earlier this month, Mkhwebane filed an urgent application in the Western Cape High Court wherein she sought an interdict to stop the parliamentary process to remove her from office.

She asked the court for an order forcing Modise  to provide her with reasons for her decision to approve the motion by Mazzone to remove her from office.

Earlier this month, Mkhwebane said she had been advised that the rules  approved by parliament in December last year were unlawful in that they amounted to a violation of the constitutionally prescribed duty imposed on organs of state to protect the independence of Chapter 9 institutions.


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