Cyril Ramaphosa to visit Tazne van Wyk's family in Elsies River

25 February 2020 - 16:36 By Aron Hyman
The parents of murdered Elsies River girl Tazne van Wyk, Terence Manuel and Carmen van Wyk, wait in the crowded courtroom for the man who allegedly murdered their child to appear.
The parents of murdered Elsies River girl Tazne van Wyk, Terence Manuel and Carmen van Wyk, wait in the crowded courtroom for the man who allegedly murdered their child to appear.
Image: Esa Alexander

The grieving parents of eight-year-old Tazne van Wyk are expecting a visit from President Cyril Ramaphosa in the Cape Flats suburb of Elsies River on Tuesday.

The Western Cape ANC confirmed Ramaphosa’s visit to 65 Clare Street, where Tazne was last seen by her parents before she was allegedly kidnapped by Moehydien Pangaker.

The 54-year-old has been charged with her murder, and Ramaphosa’s visit to “express his heartfelt condolences and sympathy” follows a riot after Pangaker’s appearance in Goodwood magistrate's court on Friday.

Hundreds of protesters torched houses and flats which the community alleged were used as drug dens and brothels. The community also alleged that Pangaker took Tazne to one of the houses before he murdered her.

Pangaker was arrested in the Eastern Cape and allegedly led police to the murder scene in Worcester and was able to point out a stormwater pipe where they found the girl's body.

Western Cape community safety MEC Albert Fritz said on Tuesday the criminal justice system had failed the Van Wyk family.

This was after it emerged that Pangaker absconded from parole in 2015 after being convicted of culpable homicide, child abuse and kidnapping in 2008.

“It is the job of our justice system to keep criminals behind bars. If it is true that this suspect, who had previously been convicted and released 11 times, was able to get parole and commit this violent crime, then our criminal justice system has failed our residents. Further investigation is needed into the systemic issues faced in our parole system,” said Fritz.

According to Fritz, Pangaker's 11 previous convictions included murder, possession of a stolen vehicle, assault, theft and housebreaking.

He said Pangaker was released in 2015 having served only seven years, and despite having previously broken the terms of his correctional supervision.

“He was placed on parole supervision between October 2016 and May 2019. He then again absconded supervision and a case was opened,” said Fritz.

“Clarity is needed on why Pangaker was not arrested after he absconded. I will ask the Western Cape police ombudsman, JJ Brand, to urgently investigate this.”

Pangaker was remanded in custody until April 17 for further investigation.


X