Malema takes aim at Ramaphosa at #BLM protest: 'He sold out'

08 June 2020 - 18:53 By ZINGISA MVUMVU and AFP
EFF leader Julius Malema, outside the US embassy in Pretoria during a protest against racism and white supremacy.
EFF leader Julius Malema, outside the US embassy in Pretoria during a protest against racism and white supremacy.
Image: Alaister Russell/The Sunday Times.

EFF leader Julius Malema on Monday took aim at President Cyril Ramaphosa, who he accused of having no right to speak on #BlackLivesMatter and of "selling out" pre-1994.

Malema was speaking at the EFF's march to the US embassy in Pretoria in the wake of global protests against the killing of American George Floyd by police.

Ramaphosa, in his capacity as ANC president, last Friday launched the Black Friday campaign, also in support of the worldwide outrage inspired by Floyd’s death.

The firebrand EFF leader said Ramaphosa was the last person would could say anything about black lives, accusing him of complicity in the killing of mineworkers in Marikana in 2012.

“Ramaphosa has got no leg to even pretend that he cares about the lives of black people,” said Malema.

His tirade against Ramaphosa went on, as he accused the president of having sold his soul to whiteness as far back at the 1980s. 

Malema also attacked the president for opening the economy during the Covid-19 lockdown. He said Ramaphosa did this because he valued money more than black lives.

The party organised simultaneous demonstrations in Pretoria, Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban in support of global protests.

In Pretoria, Malema and the protesters knelt for eight minutes and 46 seconds - the time that white officer Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck.

"Enough with police brutality on our black bodies!" Malema told the crowd.

He was flanked by the widow of Collins Khosa, who was allegedly beaten to death by security forces in April after he was reportedly caught drinking at a time when alcohol sales were banned under lockdown regulations.

Malema also slammed US President Donald Trump, saying he represented "white supremacy".

Dozens of people have in recent days attended a handful of small anti-racism protests across South Africa following Floyd's death.


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