Mzansi reacts to IFP election poster withdrawal, plus two other political parties’ signs that caused a stir

Some accused the IFP of trying to “score political points” by aligning itself with the Royal family

12 October 2021 - 11:00
The IFP says the picture of Zulu Prince Misuzulu was used erroneously on its election poster.
The IFP says the picture of Zulu Prince Misuzulu was used erroneously on its election poster.
Image: Sandile Ndlovu

The IFP received some flak on social media this week for featuring an image of Zulu Prince Misuzulu KaZwelithini on its election poster

The poster was circulated on social media platforms, raising questions about the royal's political alliance.

The party said it partners with traditional leaders and advocates for their resourcing, as this enables them to serve their communities.

“We partner with traditional leaders by recognising just how vital traditional leaders are and how important it is to support and resource Amakhosi, so that they can execute their functions of ensuring that communities’ needs are met and that everyone is treated with dignity and respect,” read the poster.

The party later issued an apology, saying the picture was used erroneously. The IFP apologised to the royal family and traditional prime minister Mangosuthu Buthelezi. 

“Disciplinary action will be taken against the implicated staff members.

“The IFP remains steadfast in our continued support of traditional leadership, as per SA’s democratic dispensation,” said the party. 

On social media, some accused the party of trying to “score political points” by aligning itself with the royal family. 

As election campaigning heats up ahead of the November 1 polls, several political parties have come under scrutiny for displaying controversial posters.

“The ANC called you racist, The DA calls you heroes,” read a DA poster spotted in Phoenix, north of Durban.

The township came under the spotlight during the July unrest as racial tensions between black and Indian residents erupted. As a result, 36 people lost their lives.

The party was accused of stirring racial divisions in the community and has since taken down the posters. 

The EFF also landed in hot water with the City of Cape Town as it failed to remove its election banners erected on street poles around the city.

According to Sunday Times Daily, the city’s approved election rules state that only posters, and not banners may be erected for purposes of campaigning.

The EFF banners erected at Blaauwberg road, Centre Point and West Beach, according to the party, appear to be twice the size of election posters erected by opposition parties.

The EFF said it will not remove the banners and instructed the DA not to touch them.

“The DA must not make the mistake of thinking they will touch our banners. We are everywhere, their biggest mistake was to think that we were not ready,” said the party on Twitter. 


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