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‘Chasing’ Ramaphosa in North West is a sign of things to come: DA’s Siviwe Gwarube

04 May 2022 - 10:00
DA national spokesperson Siviwe Gwarube says the booing of President Cyril Ramaphosa during a May Day rally was no surprise. File photo.
DA national spokesperson Siviwe Gwarube says the booing of President Cyril Ramaphosa during a May Day rally was no surprise. File photo.
Image: Jaco Marais

DA deputy chief whip and party spokesperson Siviwe Gwarube says the booing of President Cyril Ramaphosa at the Cosatu rally on Workers’ Day did not come as a surprise and is a sign of things to come.

She told MPs on Tuesday the high levels of youth unemployment, dysfunctional municipalities, endemic corruption and looting of state resources cited in the state capture inquiry reports led to frustration for millions of South Africans who feel the effects daily.

“People have long lost hope in this government. That became clear when Ramaphosa was prevented from delivering a May Day address on Sunday because workers are demanding better from government. South Africans don’t get any services from government.

“The chasing of the president out of North West is only the beginning of things to come. People can no longer be fed lies and history lessons about the liberation movement that fought oppression. The true barometer of freedom is how this government tackles the unemployment and crime crisis,” said Gwarube.

She said the ruling party should not claim false victories while millions languish in poverty brought about by joblessness. 

Ramaphosa abandoned the speech he was set to deliver at the Royal Bafokeng Stadium in Rustenburg when crowds started chanting and demanding he leave.

Among concerns raised by Sibanye-Stillwater gold mine employees was a monthly salary increase of R1,000, which remains rejected by the company. 

The workers have been on a three-month-long strike after the mine rejected their demand and instead offered an R800 increase, which was rejected.

The president responded to concerns raised by the mineworkers, saying their frustration “demonstrated a broader level of discontent” that reflects their lack of trust in trade unions and political leadership.

He called on relevant stakeholders to address the concerns raised by the mineworkers.

“The wage grievances of the workers in Rustenburg deserve the attention of all stakeholders, employers and labour so a fair and sustainable settlement can be reached. As government, we are committed to play our part,” said Ramaphosa. 

On unemployment, Ramaphosa said government is working hard to alleviate its effect through the Presidential Employment Stimulus programme and the R350 social relief of distress grant that reaches 10-million eligible beneficiaries. 

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