'SuzelleDIY' star shatters Instagram illusion of the perfect working mom

30 January 2019 - 15:24 By Zola Zingithwa
Julia Anastasopoulos, who is better known by her onscreen personas Suzelle and Tali Babes.
Julia Anastasopoulos, who is better known by her onscreen personas Suzelle and Tali Babes.
Image: Ruvan Boshoff

Julia Anastasopoulos might be the star of the hit web series SuzelleDIY and have her own Showmax series, Tali's Wedding Diary, but at the end of the day she's still just an ordinary woman trying to juggle the challenges of motherhood and a career.

Anastasopoulos posted a long Instagram message about struggling to get things done while being a mother to a six-month-old baby girl who is "needy and teething".

The aim of her confession was to show that even though she loves celebrating her daughter's many milestones with beautiful snaps on Instagram, these sorts of photos don't tell the "whole story" of what it's like being a mother 24/7.

"Although it may seem like I have my sh*t together, I promise you that 80% of the time I’m in a tired pair of leggings covered in mushed up pieces of peach and a baby clinging to my hip," Anastasopoulos wrote on Instagram.

"There are gloriously wonderful parts of this motherhood thing ... but there are also hard parts and it really is exhausting and relentless — especially when you need to work and function as if you are your old self."

View this post on Instagram

The other day someone asked me how I do it all - mother and work and manage so well and I realized that my instagram definitely doesn’t tell the whole story - most likely because when I’m wrestling a baby to sleep for the tenth time in a day and we are both ugly crying I’m not exactly taking cute selfies of us. Maybe I should be? I don’t know. But in the interest of keeping it real I just wanted to say that yes I am managing the momming and yes I am doing a bit of work here and there BUT for the most part I am spending 24 hours a day with a needy, teething, 6 month old who’s latest development is biting my nipples and crying when I put her down or leave the room. So here we are right now - it’s Tuesday afternoon and although I have a thousand things on my list, I am currently stuck under my sleeping baby. (Oh the irony of only being able to get stuff done when they sleep) The bed isn’t made and my hair has basically dreadlocked itself into mom bun and I’m hobbling around because my 9 kilogram baby only wants to be carried at the moment and my back is wrecked. So although it may seem like I have my sh*t together I promise you that 80% of the time I’m in a tired pair of leggings covered in mushed up pieces of peach and a baby clinging to my hip. When I do have to pull myself together and work/shoot/perform it takes a LOT of psyching myself up and a lot of help which I am lucky enough to have. Of course I Iove posting and sharing all the good parts and happy baby milestones and fun work things but I do recognize that it doesn’t always tell the whole story. There are gloriously wonderful parts of this motherhood thing that make me want to dance and happy cry and shout the love I feel from the rooftops. But there are also hard parts and it really is exhausting and relentless - especially when you need to work and function as if you are your old self. It’s an insane juggle. I see you and feel you mamas. Lets extricate ourselves from our sweaty sleeping babies and have that glass of wine/sugary milky coffee/packet of chuckles because seriously, whatever gets you through 💖

A post shared by Julia Anastasopoulos (@julia_knolc) on

Anastasopoulos is one of many celebrities who have come forward to out Martha Stewart-esque depictions of motherhood on social media as being an illusion.

Others include TV producer Shonda Rhimes, who talks about there being no such thing as "a balance" while being a working mom in her TED talk, and Naptime With Joey author Laura Izumikawa who recently uploaded an Instagram post showing that there are two sides to every idyllic baby photo.

Moms everywhere need to be encouraged to let go of the idea that they need to always be perfect, which is why the many women commenting on Anastasopoulos’ post were grateful for her honesty.


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