Four cooking tips we learnt from watching 'Dinner at Somizi's'

The celebrity foodie is full of ideas

10 September 2020 - 00:00 By Batandwa Malingo
The chance to do a cooking show is a dream come true for celebrity Somizi Mhlongo.
The chance to do a cooking show is a dream come true for celebrity Somizi Mhlongo.
Image: Supplied/DStv 1Magic

I am NOT a chef”: these five words have almost become the opening line of celeb Somizi Mhlongo-Motaung's hit cooking show, Dinner at Somizi's.

However, as the Idols SA judge proves during each episode, just because you're not formally trained in the culinary arts, doesn't mean you can't get creative in the kitchen and serve up delicious meals to your friends.

Here are some cooking tips we learnt while watching Somgaga in action:

1. NEVER THROW AWAY YOUR 'LEFTOVER' SPICES

During the first episode of his show, Somizi shared a golden rule: never throw away the last little bit of seasoning in a packet; instead, decant it into a new container and add other odds and ends as you finish off the bottles of spices in your pantry.

In doing so you'll create your own unique spice blend and, after a month or so, will have enough to use in a dish. The mixture apparently works like magic on meat, especially on lamb.

2. MARINATE YOUR MEAT THE DAY BEFORE YOU EAT

If you want your meat to absorb lots of flavour, you should marinate it the day before you plan on serving it. Somizi suggests marinating it for about 12 hours before you cook it.

3. EGG WASH FOR THE WIN

When making his Meaty Novorosh Pie on the show, Somgaga suggested that you brush your pastry with beaten egg before you bake it to help it turn golden brown.

4. MAKE A PLAN B

Cooking mishaps happen to the best of us. When you're faced with a disaster, don't give up, come up with a plan B. OK, so we picked this tip up from Somizi's Instagram, but improvising is something the celeb often does on his cooking show.

Somgaga shared an example of how he improvises in the kitchen in a recent social media post. He revealed that he'd accidentally burnt the dumplings he'd been steaming — and planned on serving — in individual ramekins along with a beef potjie. Rather than bin them, he rescued them by cutting off the scorched bottoms and adding them to the top of his stew so they'd absorb the flavour from the gravy, negating any lingering burnt taste they might have had.