Sex Talk

Can using weed affect my sexual performance?

Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng answers your sexual health questions

24 March 2019 - 00:00
Some people report that using weed seems to enhance their sexual experience.
Some people report that using weed seems to enhance their sexual experience.
Image: 123RF/pavelkriuchkov

Q: I'm concerned about how weed could affect my sexual performance. Is there any research about its impact on sex?

A: People use various methods to gain sexual enhancement related to libido, performance and orgasm. Many of these substances carry different regulations depending on where you are in the world.

Sex-enhancing methods range from surgery and non-invasive genital rejuvenation procedures to creams and sex toys. Of all the drugs used, alcohol is still reported to be the most widely used. Many people still feel less judged for alcohol use than, say, marijuana.

The biggest concern with using any mental state-altering drug is that, legally, consent for sex is a big concern and the resultant risk of uncertainty or memory loss about sexual interactions makes having sex under the influence of such drugs a definite no.

People have said sex with weed seems to enhance their experience. There is a lack of research to investigate sexual dysfunction due to weed that looks into desire, quality of erection, ejaculation disorders, clitoral stimulation, vaginal lubrication and intimacy.

As weed becomes socially acceptable, owing to the recent lifting of prohibitions on personal use in SA, perhaps a wider public campaign is required to detail the types of formulations and its recommended use, as these will affect the mental state-altering effects, absorption, short-term high, long-term impact.

Sexual health concerns include:

  • Infertility: low sperm count and poor quality sperm;
  • Erectile dysfunction: it may increase desire but lead to weak erection;
  • Lower testosterone levels: particularly in long-term users; and
  • Perceptive and judgment differences: people react differently to weed and experience a high differently.

As with many sexual pleasure-related research, the bias in focus of studies is still around erection and ejaculation and not much on the clitoris, vaginal lubrication and multiple orgasmic experiences. Any research could also not have enough depth on weed. Be aware of and ensure you meet the legal requirements for consensual sexual encounters, regardless of the substance.

• Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng (MBChB), sexual and reproductive health practice, Disa Clinic, safersex.co.za. Mofokeng has recently been named SA's Commissioner of Gender Equality by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

Do you have a question about sex?

E-mail your questions to lifestyle@sundaytimes.co.za with SEX TALK as the subject. Anonymity is assured.


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