Covid-19

The great coronavirus debate: To buy in bulk, or keep calm and carry on

22 March 2020 - 00:00 By ALEX PATRICK
Stacey Taylor-Broderick and her family, from Kloof, Durban, decided not to stockpile in the face of the outbreak. Here she stocks her cupboards with the usual groceries.
Stacey Taylor-Broderick and her family, from Kloof, Durban, decided not to stockpile in the face of the outbreak. Here she stocks her cupboards with the usual groceries.
Image: Supplied

The Taylor-Broderick family held a meeting last weekend and decided they would not stockpile food and household items.

Stacey Taylor-Broderick, 44, her husband Michael, 56, and their two sons, aged five and eight, decided against bulk buying for two reasons.

"One, because it's not an apocalypse, and secondly - on a more practical level - we get paid on the 25th," Stacey said this week.

"And we can't go and stock up a store-room and sit there with all our food while other households are unable to do so.

"On Sunday we got what we needed from the shop, like we normally do, just a few bits and pieces so we can stay strong and healthy, which is what we need at a time like this. But our concern is for other people."

She said she was happy with the "proactive" measures the government has put in place. "If Italy had [taken these measures] they wouldn't be where they are today. We've been given guidance, now we must go and work with it.

"A friend living in Australia said in her area, police had to be called to break up fights over toilet paper! Shows you people can have a lot and it won't be enough."

Stacey, a health and fitness professional, and husband Michael, a lighting designer, live and work in Kloof, Durban.

Because of the Covid-19 precautions, the family went from a two-income household to a one-income household when the private gym Stacey worked from closed temporarily. Her husband has a steady income, though the work he does in theatres has been suspended.

"I have no income for as long as this lasts," said Stacey. "My husband is also a playwright and now that Grahamstown [the National Arts Festival] is off and other overseas work he had is suspended, we have just his main job to rely on.

The impact will last months, and we are a middle-income household. Imagine how other families are struggling. Artists like musicians, who just have their art to survive on, are suffering."

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