WATCH | ‘I’m possible’ — SA amputee dancer makes ‘Britain’s Got Talent’ history with incredible performance

29 May 2023 - 06:30
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South African-born dancer Musa Motha recently made Britain’s Got Talent history when he achieved the show’s first-ever group Golden Buzzer, blowing away the judges and fans with his act.

Musa, 27, is an amputee after being diagnosed with cancer.

“I was a football player before I got amputated. After my amputation I fell in love with music. My friends were dancing at the time and I asked them to teach me how to dance,” he explained.

He recounted how his friends taught him to use his crutches as “legs”.

His love of music and dance brought to him to the stage of the popular show where his routine pushed everyone out of their seats, and saw many in tears.

The judges and crowd gave him a standing ovation.

In a moment that left many with goosebumps, the crowd called for him to get a Golden Buzzer, which would put him straight through to the semifinals of this year's competition. The judges agreed.

Musa hopes to inspire with his performances, and the response since it aired shows he has done that.

Legendary judge Simon Cowell stood alongside Musa and the other judges on stage and hailed him as a “hero”.

“I have never, ever heard a reaction like that in my life”.

“Wow! What a performance. You had me in tears. It was absolutely phenomenal. You inspire. You are indeed possible. Super proud of you. An absolute example to all of us,” wrote Margaret Mensah-Williams.

Sadiya Ally said it made her proud to be South African.

“Brought tears to my eyes. What an amazing dancer given his disability. Proudly South African”. 

Reflecting on the moment, Musa said he was a true believer, and example, of breaking the word “impossible” into two.

“I'm possible,” he said.


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