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Sat Apr 25 14:31:01 SAST 2015

Government using apartheid as an excuse: survey

Sapa | 15 November, 2012 15:29
South Africa's President Zuma and his deputy Motlante attend the ANC policy meeting in Midrand
South African president Jacob Zuma and deputy president Kgalema Motlanthe. File photo. Many of the country's youth feel the government isn't doing enough to manage labour unrest, and are instead hiding behind apartheid policy as an excuse.
Image by: SIPHIWE SIBEKO / Reuters

South African youth feel government is not doing enough to manage labour unrest, according to a survey released by research company Pondering Panda on Thursday.

"It was found that the government was not seen to be doing enough to manage labour unrest, and (was) hiding behind the apartheid policy of the past as an excuse," the company said in a statement.

In total, 72% of respondents - across 3 998 South Africans aged between 18 and 34 - felt there was no evidence to suggest that government's plans for dealing with labour unrest were working.

In addition, 70% of respondents said government should take responsibility for strike violence and stop blaming the past.

There were few differences across demographic groups.

"This is an indictment of the government's inability to deal with the wave of violent strikes that the company is experiencing.

"Young South Africans appear to be getting tired of the notion that apartheid is still responsible for many of our problems."

This lack of faith might result in younger voters being alienated from the political process.

Interviews were conducted earlier this month.

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