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Sun Jun 26 01:08:12 SAST 2016

Red wine taken off elixir list by UK health experts

Staff reporter | 08 January, 2016 00:36
The UK government currently advises that men do not drink more than three to four units a day - up to 21 units or less a week - while women should drink no more than two to three units a day, or 14 units a week. File photo
Image by: Thinkstock

Red wine is bad for your health, experts reveal in a new report.

In an about turn, British government experts have dismissed the supposed health benefits of wine and are set to rewrite the book on the nation's alcohol consumption, according to reports.

A landmark report by chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies, due to be published today, will destroy the long-held belief that red wine can cut the risk of cancer, heart disease and memory loss even when drunk in moderation, The Sun reported.

In the first overhaul of alcohol guidelines for two decades, doctors will reportedly warn that there is no ''safe'' level of alcohol consumption and drinking just a small amount may in fact increase the risk of some cancers.

A source said: ''The report will send a clear signal that the dangers of drinking are far more than previously thought.''

The review was launched in 2012 and its findings are expected to reflect the latest research that links even occasional alcohol consumption to health problems in later life.

The UK government currently advises that men do not drink more than three to four units a day - up to 21 units or less a week - while women should drink no more than two to three units a day, or 14 units a week.

Under the new guidelines drinkers will be told to keep off the booze for at least two days a week to allow their livers to recover.

A recent study by University College London found patients who gave up booze for four weeks saw benefits for their liver function, blood pressure and cholesterol levels and were also at lower risk of liver disease.

A report by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence advised middle-aged people there is "no safe level of alcohol consumption" and that the same health benefits can be achieved with exercise and healthy eating.

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