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Tue Jun 28 18:52:53 CAT 2016

Cape's bold new living

Nashira Davids | 22 February, 2016 00:17
"It's called the 'better living' model because of its potential to pioneer a new approach to inclusive urban development," Premier Helen Zille said in her state of the province address last week. File photo
Image by: Trevor Samson/Business Day.

Cape Town unveils a pioneering plan today to help undo apartheid's legacy by building an integrated community "on the doorstep of the city bowl".

In partnership with the city council, social housing institutions and private developers, the Western Cape government is planning a "mixed-use, mixed-income, mixed-tenure, residentially led development" on the site of the old Conradie Hospital.

"It's called the 'better living' model because of its potential to pioneer a new approach to inclusive urban development," Premier Helen Zille said in her state of the province address last week.

The development will be built on 22ha between Pinelands and Thornton. According to a document issued to prospective investors, the government plans to build 3600 homes, half of them subsidised.

There will also be retail and commercial space, two primary schools and a high school. Construction of phase one is set for April 2018.

Edgar Pieterse, director of the African Centre for Cities, welcomed news of the development, but said "the devil is in the detail. For example, how many subsidised units will form part of the total? Who will have the right to be in those subsidised houses? People on the waiting list or people who work in that area?

"Furthermore, what incentives are being offered the private developers to buy into this model? Lastly, how will the area be managed and who will foot the bill for that role?"

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