Could this be the next Qashqai?

Nissan reveals dramatic crossover concept vehicle brimming with style and technology

05 March 2019 - 14:14 By Motoring Reporter
The high-riding crossover vehicle wears 22-inch wheels and features a very tall shoulder line with extra-slim windows. Picture: SUPPLIED
The high-riding crossover vehicle wears 22-inch wheels and features a very tall shoulder line with extra-slim windows. Picture: SUPPLIED

Nissan is unveiling its futuristic IMQ concept vehicle at the Geneva motor show.

Apart from possibly giving us an insight into the styling direction of the next-generation Qashqai and Juke, it’s a showcase for Nissan’s advanced technology.

The flamboyantly-styled IMQ has enough sharp angles to make a Lexus jealous, and the car's lower body cladding consists of black ridges called lamellas which Nissan says are "evocative of Japanese traditional design."

The high-riding crossover vehicle wears 22-inch wheels and features a very tall shoulder line with extra-slim windows.At the rear is a new slim line interpretation of Nissan's "boomerang" lamp cluster.

Nissan says the IMQ “seamlessly blends Japanese heritage with state-of-the-art, human-centric technology”.

It’s electric, of course, much like almost everything else being launched at Geneva this week. At its heart is a battery-powere motor that puts out an impressive 250kW and 700Nm, channelled through all-wheel drive.

Offering an insight into Nissan's high-tech future, the IMQ is equipped with an advanced prototype version of Nissan's ProPILOT driving assistance system with semi-autonomous driving capability.

The car features Nissan's Invisible-to-Visible (I2V) technology and an augmented-reality buddy for the driver. Picture: SUPPLIED
The car features Nissan's Invisible-to-Visible (I2V) technology and an augmented-reality buddy for the driver. Picture: SUPPLIED

Also, those supersized Bridgestones are "smart" tyres communicate information to the driver via the graphical user interface. Data transmitted includes tyre load, pressure, temperature, grip level, wear and tyre health. This helps the IMQ automatically calibrate its in-car control systems to work optimally.

The IMQ's doors are hinged at their outer edges and open to reveal a futuristic, spacious interior, featuring four individual seats that rise seamlessly from the lamella-covered floor.

Nissan's familiar "gliding wing" instrument panel dominates the front of the cabin, with a centre console emerging from beneath and stretching back between the front seats into the rear.

Each sculpted seat is finished in a two-tone 3D technical fabric, laser-cut in a geometric design inspired by Japanese kumiko woodwork. The pattern is replicated on the instrument panel, door trim and parcel shelf.

The graphical user interface, dominated by an 84cm screen, is completely black - like a smartphone - when powered down.

A smaller, secondary screen above the centre console hosts the IMQ's Virtual Personal Assistant. It enhances the driving experience by controlling vehicle functions, such as navigation, in response to input from the driver.

The car also features Nissan's Invisible-to-Visible (I2V) technology, a 3-D interface where the real and virtual worls converge. It helps vehicle occupants see what may otherwise be invisible, such as what is around corners. It also visualizes precise information about traffic jams and determines alternative routes.

Drivers can even enjoy the company of a virtual passenger, in the form of a 3D augmented-reality avatar inside the car.

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