WATCH | Trevor Noah on Donald Trump campaigns: It was like Africa all over again

The comedian also addressed the backlash he received after taking on 'The Daily Show'

23 May 2019 - 12:04 By Kyle Zeeman
Trevor Noah has spoken about politics in Africa and America.
Trevor Noah has spoken about politics in Africa and America.
Image: Gallo Images / Jeffrey Abrahams

SA comedian Trevor Noah has once again compared American politics to what happens in Africa, admitting that the first time he heard US president Donald Trump campaign he felt at "home".

Trevor was a guest at the #WSJFuture Of Everything Festival recently, where he opened up about his journey on The Daily Show so far. 

Trevor says he views the show as an extension of the way he and his friends view the world, but said he received backlash when he first started on it. 

"When I came to The Daily Show, the first thing people said was 'what does a South African know about American politics?' I was like, 'That is a good question, I don't know anything.' Then I realised, no, politics is fundamentally the same in most countries around the world.

"It is just the characters that change. You will find corruption everywhere. You will find oppression everywhere. I came to realise that we were telling the same story, but with just a different version."

Trevor said that things really kicked off when  Trump started campaigning, leaving him with a sense of déjà vu.

"Donald Trump came on screen and started speaking. We looked at each other and (I was) like, 'I know this guy'. This is Africa all over again. We are home."

This is not the first time Trevor has compared Trump to an African leader.

In May last year Trevor said he wasn't surprised by the corruption allegations  swarming around those close to Trump because he had always thought Trump and African dictators were in the same WhatsApp group.

"I’ve said from the very beginning that Donald Trump reminds me of an African dictator, and if you know anything about African dictators, the first thing that you have to do is follow the money and you follow the money with the closest people to them," he said.

When Trump first ran for office four years ago, Trevor said he thought the US president might make for a better African leader than an American one.


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