Dlamini-Zuma shows true colours with tirade of hate

12 December 2017 - 05:00 By The Times Editorial
A jubilant Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma makes a surprise appearance at the KwaZulu-Natal ANC provincial general council meeting in Durban.
A jubilant Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma makes a surprise appearance at the KwaZulu-Natal ANC provincial general council meeting in Durban.
Image: Jackie Clausen

ANC presidential hopeful Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma was quoted as lashing out against whites at an event with traditional and religious leaders in Bulwer in KwaZulu-Natal at the weekend. "Whites talk too much against radical economic transformation," she reportedly said. "Who are they to talk about looting? They have been stealing ever since their arrival in this country. They stole our land."

Now, this is probably the real NDZ standing up. Speaking in her rural home-town in isiZulu, she showed her true colours. Ironically, such divisive statements go against everything a "unity" movement should stand for.

But the truth is the unity campaign in the ruling party is just a cleverly crafted complot to keep the crooks in power.

Her latest statements are a foreboding of what is to come if she takes the presidency. If Dlamini-Zuma is capable of spewing such hatred now, imagine the damage she is capable of doing as the president of our country.

Her comments are symptomatic of how schizophrenic the ANC has become. A Bloomberg report suggests the likelihood of a break-up is probably the biggest in the ANC's 105-year-old history, especially if Dlamini-Zuma becomes the new leader.

Another survey, conducted by Ratepop, a technology-based research and polling company, also predicts disastrous consequences for the ANC if Dlamini-Zuma emerges victorious.

The once powerful liberation movement now suffers from a disorder that makes it difficult to function normally. It is in real danger of splitting into two; while the one half is hellbent on keeping the corrupt in power, the other half is so desperately concerned about the ANC's future and the next national general elections they run the risk of taking their eye off the ball - getting the good guys elected as its new leaders at the upcoming conference.

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