And the nightmare weather's not over yet

04 June 2013 - 03:07 By PHILANI NOMBEMBE
Clouds gather over Simon's Town Naval Dockyard, in False Bay, Cape Town, which was still in the grip of a cold front yesterday
Clouds gather over Simon's Town Naval Dockyard, in False Bay, Cape Town, which was still in the grip of a cold front yesterday
Image: HALDEN KROG

The Western Cape is mopping up after a severe storm at the weekend.

Heavy rains and strong winds displaced more than 28 000 people across the Cape Peninsula.

Lampposts were damaged, trees uprooted and roofs were blown away in Philippi, Gugulethu, Khayelitsha and Hout Bay. Mud slides forced the closure of the scenic Chapman's Peak Drive.

Kenny Africa, the head of provincial traffic services, said a road engineer who had gone to inspect a rockfall on the Franschhoek Pass died on Sunday night when rocks hit his car.

The SA Weather Service has predicted the wet and cold weather will continue until tomorrow.

The Cape Town disaster risk-management centre has warned that the water table will continue to rise, causing discomfort for people in informal settlements on the Cape Flats.

The centre's spokesman, Wilfred Solomon-Johannes, said the city had provided hot meals to those affected, and 28518 blankets to about 26490 people in waterlogged low-lying areas.

"Heavy rainfall, damaging winds and very low temperatures . caused rather unpleasant conditions over most of the western half of the province," Solomon-Johannes said.

Displaced people have been accommodated in community halls.

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