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IN PICS | 10 epic nature snaps that show why the Earth is worth saving

Prints for Nature is an initiative to raise funds for conservation — and your chance to own a NatGeo hotshot’s work. Here's a selection of stellar photos from this charitable campaign

29 November 2020 - 00:01 By Elizabeth Sleith
An Anna's hummingbird hovers above a makeshift fog machine used by scientists to study the airflow around its wings.
An Anna's hummingbird hovers above a makeshift fog machine used by scientists to study the airflow around its wings.
Image: Anand Varma/ Prints for Nature

National Geographic — the official magazine of the US-based non-profit National Geographic Society — has been published continuously since 1888.

It may surprise you to learn that the first issue contained not a single photo, since today it is synonymous with stunning photography, its pages perpetually showcasing the incredible beauty and wonders of Earth.

In a year when most intrepid travellers had to hang up their hiking boots, 85 of the magazine's leading photographers got involved in a mission to raise funds for conservation, so damaged by the Covid-19 crisis.

The argument behind the Prints for Nature campaign is that the plummet in global tourist numbers has meant a nose-dive in funding for nature and wildlife protection as well as for the communities who rely on them for their livelihood.

Typically, works by these shooters sell for thousands of dollars, but their donated prints — criss-crossing the globe from India to Tanzania to Antarctica — are available for $275 (about R4,300) until December 10.

All of the proceeds will go to Conservation International, which works in 30 countries to protect wildlife, forests and oceans, as well as their dependent local communities.

Here we bring you a small, delightful selection from the Prints for Nature collection. See the rest at printsfornature.com.

A cougar walks through Griffith Park, Los Angeles, US. Illustrating the problem of animals' habit loss as cities expand, the photo sparked a movement to protect southern California's last cougars and other wildlife in two large protected areas bisected by the 101 Freeway north of LA. Set to be completed by 2022, it will be the world's largest wildlife overpass.
A cougar walks through Griffith Park, Los Angeles, US. Illustrating the problem of animals' habit loss as cities expand, the photo sparked a movement to protect southern California's last cougars and other wildlife in two large protected areas bisected by the 101 Freeway north of LA. Set to be completed by 2022, it will be the world's largest wildlife overpass.
Image: Steve Winter/Prints for Nature
At 2,930m, Ulvetanna in Queen Maud Land is one of Antarctica's most challenging peaks. It is also known as the Wolf's Fang. Taken during the first ascent of a new route on the peak, this view shows the lower summits or "teeth" in the Wolf's Jaw.
At 2,930m, Ulvetanna in Queen Maud Land is one of Antarctica's most challenging peaks. It is also known as the Wolf's Fang. Taken during the first ascent of a new route on the peak, this view shows the lower summits or "teeth" in the Wolf's Jaw.
Image: Jimmy Chin/Prints for Nature
An orphaned reticulated giraffe nuzzles wildlife keeper Lekupania at Sarara Camp in Kenya. The giraffe was rehabilitated and returned to the wild. Giraffes are undergoing what has been referred to as a silent extinction, with populations across Africa having dropped 40% in the past three decades, to under 100,000. This photo is to benefit Conservation International for their core initiatives
An orphaned reticulated giraffe nuzzles wildlife keeper Lekupania at Sarara Camp in Kenya. The giraffe was rehabilitated and returned to the wild. Giraffes are undergoing what has been referred to as a silent extinction, with populations across Africa having dropped 40% in the past three decades, to under 100,000. This photo is to benefit Conservation International for their core initiatives
Image: Ami Vitale/@amivitale
A frozen forest in Riisitunturi National Park, Finnish Lapland.
A frozen forest in Riisitunturi National Park, Finnish Lapland.
Image: Stian Klo/Prints for Nature
A nilgai or blue bull, Asia's largest antelope, in Dudhwa National Park, Uttar Pradesh, India.
A nilgai or blue bull, Asia's largest antelope, in Dudhwa National Park, Uttar Pradesh, India.
Image: Varun Aditya/Prints for Nature
Panjin Red Beach is a reed-covered wetland in the Liaohe River delta in northeast China, one of the world's largest reed-marsh areas. Its name refers to the striking colours of its coastline, which is covered with the seepweed plant (Suaeda salsa).
Panjin Red Beach is a reed-covered wetland in the Liaohe River delta in northeast China, one of the world's largest reed-marsh areas. Its name refers to the striking colours of its coastline, which is covered with the seepweed plant (Suaeda salsa).
Image: Camille Seaman//Prints for Nature
Gannets soar above the uninhabited Boreray island in the St Kilda archipelago, part of Scotland's Outer Hebrides. The archipelago in the north Atlantic Ocean is a double Unesco World Heritage site for its natural heritage and cultural history. Its last human residents left in 1930 and it is now home to tens of thousands of gannets.
Gannets soar above the uninhabited Boreray island in the St Kilda archipelago, part of Scotland's Outer Hebrides. The archipelago in the north Atlantic Ocean is a double Unesco World Heritage site for its natural heritage and cultural history. Its last human residents left in 1930 and it is now home to tens of thousands of gannets.
Image: Jim Richardson/Prints for Nature
A mother and cub at Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park, Alaska, US. The mother was taking too long to fish and the little one seemed to be looking for sympathy.
A mother and cub at Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park, Alaska, US. The mother was taking too long to fish and the little one seemed to be looking for sympathy.
Image: Kristi Odom/Prints for Nature
Onekotan is an uninhabited volcanic island, part of Russia's Kuril Islands chain in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The image is a 26-photo aerial-drone stitch of the island.
Onekotan is an uninhabited volcanic island, part of Russia's Kuril Islands chain in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The image is a 26-photo aerial-drone stitch of the island.
Image: Renan Ozturk/Prints for Nature

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