Soccer star Kaizer Motaung Jr on the ball with aid for the needy

14 June 2020 - 00:00
Former striker Kaizer Motaung Junior talks to King Goodwill Zwelethini during his visit to the royal palace as part of the Kaizer Motaung Juis channeling his energy to help feed needy communities impacted by Covid-19
Former striker Kaizer Motaung Junior talks to King Goodwill Zwelethini during his visit to the royal palace as part of the Kaizer Motaung Juis channeling his energy to help feed needy communities impacted by Covid-19
Image: Supplied

When the announcement of a national lockdown kept people indoors, former Kaizer Chiefs striker Kaizer Motaung jnr took to the streets. It was not to defy any laws, but to assist communities where there was a desperate need for food.

“I had been sitting with the idea for a while, and when lockdown happened I knew I had to put it to action,” he said. 

Through his Kaizer Motaung Jr Foundation, he has been criss-crossing SA to deliver food parcels. “When I saw the number of people in distress, I just told myself there is no better time to start than now,” he said.

Motaung has been jumping right in to help his team with the sorting, packing and delivery of the parcels.

Less than three months since its launch, the foundation has touched thousands of lives and Motaung said the experience had been an eye-opener for him.

The foundation is focusing on rural and remote areas for the delivery of food parcels. So far the team has been to the Eastern Cape, Mpumalanga, the Free State and the Western Cape. Motaung said it was during these trips that he realised people need more than just food.

“While we were busy with our distribution in Pongola, in KwaZulu-Natal, we came across a grandmother living alone in a half-made mud house. There are no windows or doors in the house. Being in winter now, you see that this grandmother needs more than just food. She needs a decent and safe house to live in,” he said.

His foundation has now added blankets to the parcels it is delivering to needy families.

“Being hands-on with every food distribution has opened my eyes to the plight of different people. This project will continue even after lockdown, because the need will still be there.”

Motaung said that community leaders and traditional leaders played a critical role in ensuring the food was reaching the right families.

“In each area we visit, we make sure we first contact the community leaders, chiefs and indunas to get direction from them, because they know their communities better than anyone.

“With the help of our generous partners we are able to touch many lives and will continue doing so,” he said.


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